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Thursday, 18 December 2014

Astronomical phenomena January 2015.




Calendar with astronomical events for you to observe.
Opportunities for observation for January 2015:

Here's how it looks:

02, 03 january 2015 - Quadrantids. Quadrantid meteor shower, get to have up to 40 meteors per hour, usually on 3 and 4 January, but may be visible on 1-5 January. The highest rate of meteors per hour took place in 1932 (80/ hour). The best time for observations is a dark place after midnight. Meteors radiate from the constellation Bootes, close to the North Star.
The source of this meteor shower was unknown until December 2003 when Peter Jenniskens of the Ames Research Center (NASA) found evidence that meteoroids come from 2003 EH1 , an "asteroid", which is probably a piece of a comet which collapsed 500 years ago.

Unfortunately, nearly full Moon will block most brilliant meteors this year. The best time for observing will be from a dark location after midnight.

January 04, 2015 - Earth at perihelion. Earth reaches the closest point to the Sun, 0.98333 AU at 08:59.

►January 5, 2015 - Full Moon. The earth will be between the Sun and the Moon, and therefore, the Moon will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth. This phase occurs at 04:53 GMT.

►January 9, 2015 - Moon at apogee. Luna reach the farthest point from Earth (405411 km from Earth), at 18:17 GMT

►January 11, 2015 - Mercury-Venus 0.6 ° at 01:00 GMT.

January 13, 2015 - Moon at the last quarter. at 01:00 GMT.

January 13, 2015 - Comet C / 2013 G9 (Tenagra) reaches perihelion, the closest position of the sun. It was discovered on April 15, 2013. No data yet about its orbit or diameter.

January 14, 2015 - Comet 201P / LONEOS reaches perihelion, the closest position of the sun. It was discovered 09 August 2001. No data about its diameter. It has an orbit of 6.47 years.

►January 20, 2015 - New Moon. Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth. This phase occurs at 13:14 GMT.

►January 21, 2015 - The moon reaches perigee, the closest point to Earth (359643 km from Earth) at 20:06 GMT

January 21, 2015 - Mercury perihelion. The planet will be at its closest point to the Sun at 20:00.

January 21, 2015 - Comet D / 1886 K1 (Brooks) reaches perihelion, the closest position of the sun. It was discovered on May 25, 1886. No data about its diameter. It has an orbit of 5.44 years.

January 26, 2015 - The asteroid 357439 (2004 BL86) 3.1 Moon distances of our planet. It was discovered on January 30, 2004. Its diameter is 0.4-1 km. It has an orbit of 1.84 years.

►January 27, 2015Moon at the first quarter. at 04:48 GMT

January 30, 2015 - Comet 7P / Pons-Winnecke reaches perihelion, the closest position of the sun. It was discovered on June 12, 1819. Its diameter is 5.2 km. It has an orbit of 6.37 years.

►January 30, 2015 - Mercury at inferior conjunction. Mercury passes between the Earth and the Sun, at 14:00 GMT.

January 31, 2015 - Asteroid (2008 CQ) 4.8 Moon distances from our planet. It has an orbit of 5.5 years.

 Previous calendar:  Astronomical phenomena December 2014



Tuesday, 16 December 2014

Copernicus Moon Crater filmed by astronomical telescope.





This is a video I have captured crater Copernicus (93 km) in unique circumstances for me in a light that I have never seen it. Observing this area through the telescope, is also subject to other articles, in which as usual, I presented simple video captures, but also Registax processings.

Copernicus's beauty is magnified because of its position on the center of the Moon, and in this way we see the round shape, as being above it. Here we can admire its dark inside and the outside in sunlight.

This video was also used in Registax program to process images with higher quality, but also for simple video captures.
Registax Photo Images are here.


The video was done with the camera mounted on the telescope, specifically on the telescope eyepiece. To protect telescope of vibrations, I used a guide motor from Lacerta, and thus the image was more stable. 


However, even with this tracking device for celestial bodies, there were vibrations of the telescope tube, causing the image to be slightly unstable. For this, I used the video stabilization option in Sony Vegas editing software, so the video was 100% correct on this issue.


Moon Age: 9.05 days
Phase: 70.5% (0% = New, 100% = Full)
Distance: 399.221 km


Optics (telescope or lenses): Celestron C8-Newtonian telescope, eyepiece 20mm Plossl, 2x barlow
Mount: CG5 (EQ5)
Camera: Sony CX130
Filter: no
Date: 10/03/2014
Location: Baia Mare, Romania
Processing: Sony Vegas HD Platinum 10.0





Saturday, 13 December 2014

Enjoying the Moon. Registax Images of Maginus crater on the Moon by telescope.

125 video frames, in Registax.
1 video frames, in Registax.

These pictures are processings in Registax. Many of the images of the same area and the same evening, were posted in other articles but those were simple video captures. For these however, I needed more time for images resulted from Registax, where images are clear and covers a larger area of the lunar surface.

On the south pole of the Moon, are the most numerous craters, as we see it from Earth, and the crater Maginus (163 km) on these images, deserves its place among the other notable craters. It is large in size and the edge is affected by other impacts. Its neighbors are Clavius (225 km) at southwest, and Heraclitus (90 km) at east. These craters are oval because their position on the Moon so they are seen obliquely, but they are round like Moon craters located in the center.

Image of 29 April 2012.

Moon Age: 9.05 days
Phase: 70.5% (0% = New, 100% = Full)
Distance: 399.221 km


Optics (telescope or lenses): Celestron C8-Newtonian telescope, eyepiece 20mm Plossl, 2x barlow
Mount: CG5 (EQ5)
Camera: Sony CX130
Filter: no
Date: 10/03/2014
Location: Baia Mare, Romania
Processing: Registax,  FastStone Image Viewer




 
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