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Wednesday, 1 July 2015

Babbage crater on the Moon by astronomical telescope.







In front of Pythagoras (which is not seen here), we see a large crater named Babbage (143 km), one with a depth of 2 km.
The remnant crater named South, is entered in its southeastern floor.

Babbage's outer wall was eroded and modified by other multiple impacts until all that was left of it was a ring of rounded hills. Over the southern edge is observed Babbage E (68 km), whose northern edge is practically nonexistent forming a kind of golf within Babbage.



The predominant feature in these pictures is Mare Frigoris, a narrow strip located north of Mare Imbrium basin, identified by the darker area.

On Mare Frigoris and on the eastern edge of Sinus Roris, we see an isolated crater called Harpalus (39 km). This is a recent crater and has a depth of 2.9 km. As a novelty, is that its interior is visible, something I hadn't noticed the other nights.


Magnitude: -12.03
Phase: 70.5% (0% = new, 100% = full)
Distance: 398.311 km
Sidereal Period: 27.32 days
Illuminated: 92.2%


Optics: Celestron C8-Newtonian astronomical telescope 
Eyepiece: Plossl 20mm, 2x Barlow
Mount: CG5 (EQ5)
Camera: Sony CX130
Filter: no
Date: 14/03/2014
Location: Baia Mare, Romania
Processing: FastStone Image Viewer




Craters were filmed with a video camera attached to an astronomical 203 mm Newtonian telescope.


In the picture below are labeled craters and other lunar features in the region. To better understand this photo, you should note that the label with the name or the letter of larger craters could be found at their center, and on the small craters, you should find them around them, usually above.


Sunday, 28 June 2015

Schickard crater on the Moon by astronomical telescope.

Schickard (227 km) is the huge crater in images with a shallow depth compared to its size. It is located on the southwestern edge of the Moon quite close to it (the terminal). On its floor we see several shades, and a few small satellite craters.

Far more to the terminal, is a flooded crater in shadow, and difficult to observe because of its position on the lunar disc, called Inghirami (91 km). In some images are also present Phocylides, Nasmyth and Wargentin. They are south of Schickard.
Shickard crater lies in the southwest of the Moon near the edge. As a result it appears to be elongated. At the top of the crater lies Lehmann (53 Km.), And farther to the east, Drebbel (30 Km.).
Do not forget that in these pictures the Moon is upside down.



Magnitude: -12.03
Phase: 70.5% (0% = new, 100% = full)
Distance: 398.311 km
Sidereal Period: 27.32 days
Illuminated: 92.2%


Optics: Celestron C8-Newtonian astronomical telescope 
Eyepiece: Plossl 20mm, 2x Barlow
Mount: CG5 (EQ5)
Camera: Sony CX130
Filter: no
Date: 14/03/2014
Location: Baia Mare, Romania
Processing: FastStone Image Viewer


Images were obtained by attaching a camera directly into the eyepiece of an astronomical telescope of 8 inch Newtonian; For this reason the eyepiece visual field was increased.

In the picture below are labeled craters and other lunar features in the region. To better understand this photo, you should note that the label with the name or the letter of larger craters could be found at their center, and on the small craters, you should find them around them, usually above.


Image from 2010.

Image from January 15, 2011.


Read this article in Romanian.

Friday, 26 June 2015

Telescopic images of Jupiter planet the largest planet.

The most massive planet in our solar system, has four moons and other smaller moons, Jupiter forms a kind of a solar system in miniature, because it resembles a star in composition.
In fact, if it was about 80 times more massive, would have been a sun rather than a planet.

Jupiter has been known since ancient times. It is a planet visible to the naked eye. For the Babylonians, this object was the god Marduk. They used the orbit the planet around the Sun of about 12 years, to define their zodiac constellations.

Jupiter observation does not require a telescope. Even with binoculars you can see the planet and its satellites on the left and right . To observe the surface of Jupiter, you need at least a telescope mirror of 5 "(12.7 cm) diameter.

Jupiter offers an extraordinary detail and a wide variety of storm colors visible on the surface. As you gain experience, you will be able to detect more subtle details. Features of Jupiter are in constant motion. The planet rotates 360 °, in less than 10 hours, so in one evening, you will see more than half the planet's disk.



Optics: Celestron C8-Newtonian astronomical telescope, plossl 20mm, 2x Barlow
Mount: CG5 (EQ5)
Camera: Sony CX130
Filter: no
Date: 31.12.2012
Location: Baia Mare, Romania
Processing: FastStone Image Viewer


Most massive planet in our solar system, has four moons and other smaller moons, Jupiter forms a kind of a solar system in miniature, because it resembles a star in composition.
In fact, if it was about 80 times more massive, would have been a sun rather than a planet. - See more at: http://lupuvictor.blogspot.ro/2012/05/pictures-of-jupiter-through-telescope.html#sthash.aKrMNoSh.dpuf
Most massive planet in our solar system, has four moons and other smaller moons, Jupiter forms a kind of a solar system in miniature, because it resembles a star in composition.
In fact, if it was about 80 times more massive, would have been a sun rather than a planet. - See more at: http://lupuvictor.blogspot.ro/2012/05/pictures-of-jupiter-through-telescope.html#sthash.aKrMNoSh.dpuf
Most massive planet in our solar system, has four moons and other smaller moons, Jupiter forms a kind of a solar system in miniature, because it resembles a star in composition.
In fact, if it was about 80 times more massive, would have been a sun rather than a planet. - See more at: http://lupuvictor.blogspot.ro/2012/05/pictures-of-jupiter-through-telescope.html#sthash.aKrMNoSh.dpuf

 
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