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Thursday, 21 August 2014

Astronomical phenomena September 2014



Opportunities for observation for September 2014:


08 september 2014 - Moon reaches perigee, the closest point to Earth (358,388 km from Earth) at 05:30 GMT +2.

09 september 2014 - Full Moon. Earth is between the Sun and the Moon and so the Moon will be fully illuminated as seen from Earth. This phase occurs at 03:38 GMT +2.

12 september 2014 -Mercury at aphelion. The planet will be at its farthest point from the Sun at 00:00.

20 september 2014 - Moon at apogee. Luna reaches the farthest point from Earth (405,846 km from Earth) at 16:23 GMT +2.

23 september 2014 - September Equinox.September Equinox occurs at 04:29 GMT +2. The Sun will shine directly on the equator Days and nights will be almost equal in the whole world. This is also the first day of fall (autumn equinox) on the northern hemisphere, and the first day of spring (vernal equinox), in the southern hemisphere.

24 september 2014 - New Moon. Moon will be directly between the Earth and the Sun and will not be visible from Earth. This phase occurs at 08:14 GMT +2.

28 september 2014 - Moon-Saturn occultation. Saturn 0.8 ° S of Moon at 6:46.

Legend:
-Perihelion-position in the orbit of a planet closest to the Sun.
-Aphelion - position in the orbit of a planet farthest from the Sun.
-Perigee -  the position of the Moon closest to Earth.
-Apogee -  the position of the Moon farthest to Earth.
-Inferior Conjunction - Mercury or Venus passing between the Earth and Sun.
-Superior Conjunction - Mercury or Venus passes on the opposite side of the Sun from Earth.
-Greatest elongation - elongation is the angle between the Sun and a planet as seen from Earth, during eastern elongation (E), the planet appears as an evening star, during western elongation (W), the planet appears as a morning star.
-Opposition - position in the orbit of a planet when opposites the Sun as seen from Earth.

-Conjunction - position in the orbit of a planet when appears closer to the Sun as seen from Earth.
-Occultation - Moon occults or eclipses a star or a planet.
-Ascending Node - the point where a planet passes from the southern to the northern part of its orbit.
-Descending Node - the point where a planet passes from the northern to the southern side of its orbit.




Tuesday, 19 August 2014

Craters on the Moon: Moretus Gruemberger and Cysatus



Note here an area where I had always loved to turn my telescope, namely Southern Moon, where are numerous craters of all shapes. Moretus (114 km) is the most beautiful of them, but I have will not talk about it here. There are plenty of other articles in which is described in details.

As a new observation for me, are the two craters northwest of Moretus, called Gruemberger (94 km) and Cysatus (49 km), because I have never seen it with this look, like at this phase.

Although Gruemberger is eroded, with very worn edges, at this phase looks to be more "ordered" than it actually is.

I'm pretty sure that you guys like what you see in these pictures. I can not take my eyes off that high peaks in sunlight at the edge of the Moon. The heights are not mountains, but the edges of craters which lies between the seen and unseen side of the Moon.

Other craters seen here are Curtius (95 km), Zach (71 km), Pentland (56 km), Sempilius (70 km), and Short (71 km).





Moon Age: 9.05 days
Phase: 70.5% (0% = New, 100% = Full)
Distance: 399.221 km


Optics: Celestron C8-Newtonian telescope, 20mm Plossl, 2x barlow
Mount: CG5 (EQ5)
Camera: Sony CX130
Filter: no
Date: 10/03/2014
Location: Baia Mare, Romania
Processing: Registax, FastStone Image Viewer












Sunday, 17 August 2014

Backyard Astrophotography. Bullialdus crater.




I've never caught Bullialdus crater (61 km) to such phase, the terminal line passes over it and over its satellite craters Bullialdus A (26 km) and B (21 km).

You have to keep in mind, that the images are inverted, as seen through a telescope. So the cardinal points are also reversed.

In these lighting conditions we can see how high Bullialdus's edge compared to other craters.

Other craters visible here are Wolf (25 km) and Gould (34 km). On the west of Wolf, we see a crater, a circle drawn on the Moon. It is a satellite crater of Wolf, called Wolf T (27 km). It has such an appearance because it was almost completely covered by lava.

Moon Age: 9.05 days
Phase: 70.5% (0% = New, 100% = Full)
Distance: 399.221 km


Optics: Celestron C8-Newtonian telescope, 20mm Plossl, 2x barlow
Mount: CG5 (EQ5)
Camera: Sony CX130
Filter: no
Date: 10/03/2014
Location: Baia Mare, Romania
Processing: Registax, FastStone Image Viewer





 
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